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ZF S5D320Z Repair Proceedures

 
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peerless



Joined: 12 Nov 2003
Posts: 1721
Location: Orange County, Ca

PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2010 3:50 pm    Post subject: ZF S5D320Z Repair Proceedures Reply with quote

I recently had to go through and perform 2 service bulletin repairs for the S5D320Z 5 speed transmission. This is the trans used behind the S5x family and is popular for swappers.

This transmission was installed in the E36/7 Z3 M52B28, M54B30, S52/ E39 M52B28, M54B30/ E39 touring M54/B25/ E46 M52B28, M54B30/ E53 M54B30 All of them from production start until 3/02.

Sometimes the Getrag 240 is used as it is favored for its close ratios, but is also fairly weak as it was used behind a 136HP M42. The second choice used is the Getrag 260 along with its annoying 'Getrag Rattle' and also a custom cross member is needed as well as having to twist the linkage a few degrees for the shifter to align properly.

For those that want a direct bolt in and have the rated capability of handling 320HP, then the ZF transmission is the one you want. But be warned, just as all the others have there weak spots so does the ZF. There where 2 service bulletins, well several but we are only concerned with the 2 main ones.

The first bulletin is for 'Hard Shifting'. This is due to the catch pins partially or fully seizing in the bores. These are what give you the 'Notchy' feeling when you shift through the gears. The problem here was it would get extremely hard to get into first gear and other gears.

The second bulletin is for the 5th and Reverse detent springs. These are known to seize in the bore. What this would cause is that 5th gear would 'disappear' and you would have to 'hunt' for it. The gates between 3-4 and 5th are very close together so you would shift into 3rd instead of 5th or simply have to hope you grabbed 5th. The issue is that the spring would no longer push the gear selector back to the neutral gate.

The SIB (Service Bulletin) number for the 'Hard Shift' catch pins is SIB 23 03 02. The SIB number for the 5th and Reverse 'Gear Selector Shaft Pin Bushing Replacement' is SIB 23 04 04.

Now that we have identified the problems and identified the SI B numbers we can go about starting ordering parts and finding tools. I will tell you right now that finding the tools is not going to happen unless you have access to the dealer tools, and that as was the case with me, that they even have them available. I actually gave the dealer a open credit card number and told them to order all the tools. No luck, they maybe available, but they have no way of seeing if or when they will ship or if they are even available. Basically they are put on 'Intergalactic Back Order'. This as you can imagine took alot of wasted time waiting. After calls to several dealer to 'borrow' the tools, they either where unwilling to help, or they simply did not have the tools anymore as they have all found there way into technicians tool boxs.

Regarding the actuall tools, you need about 6 tools total to make the repairs, I got a cheapy slide hammer from Harbor Freight, there are 3 custom drifts to drive in the new bushings and end seal caps for the 5th and R repair, another 2 drifts to drive in the new sleeves and caps for the Catch Pin repair. I was able to aquire the 1 drift for the catch pin repair, I was on my own for the others. I was able to improvise but I don't recommend the way I did it. If you can gain access to a lathe, you should be able to wittle out a set of drifts for the job with basic measurements and simply single turing and facing operations. One local machine shop wanted hundreds of dollars and another machine shop I had previously worked for would not allow me to use the manual lathe due to insurance reasons. I now have some serious motivation to get a basic manual lathe so I am not SOL on these types of situations.

I asked the dealer if they could perform the repairs, but they could not since they themselves no longer had the tools. I called several independants, only one offered the repair and they wanted over $500 with the trans out of the car. Again, I was forced to do the repairs with basic hand tools.

Here is a listing of all the parts needed for the repairs. All the parts came to about $80 and where available for special order.

5th and Reverse Repair parts needed.
23 11 7 542 726 Repair Kit $5.68 X2 (Contains 1 bushing, 1 seal cap, 1 lock ring)
23 31 1 224 849 Locking Pin $8.25 X1 (Detent Pin, Reverse)
23 31 7 502 165 Locking Pin $9.91 X1 (Detent Pin, 5th gear)

Catch Pin Repair parts needed.
23 11 7 525 048 Detent Pins, Set $11.97 X3 (Sleeve, Catch Pin, Spring)
07 11 9 937 227 Cover Lid $0.59 X3 (Cover Caps for catch pins)

Here is the tool numbers in the off chance someone can gain access to them.
Small Slide Hammer (needed for both repairs, can purchase most automotive tool outlets)
5th and Reverse
23 4 021 (Seal Cap and retaining ring driver)
23 4 022 (Short bushing driver for 5th gear detent bushing)
23 4 023 (Long bushing driver for Reverse detent bushing)
Catch Pin
23 2 360 (cover cap driver)
23 3 110 (catch pin bushing driver)


First lets get started with the 5th and Reverse repairs:

Here is your 2 pins and springs. The upper one is the reverse and it is a very stiff spring, color coded red. The lower one is 5th and the most troublesome. This one was seized solid in the bore and had no spring action. To remove the sealing caps, undo the C-clip and use a screw driver to push in the cap on either the top or bottom and it will roll over, extract with needle nose.



Next you have to extract the frozen detent pins. There is no way to grab them with pliers so I used a expanding collet from my die grinder set, slipped that into the bore of the pin and screwed in a sheet metal screw and used the slide hammer to pull it out.



Now this is where it really starts to suck, you have to peel out the old bushing, start at the split using a small screwdriver and hammer it down and split the bushing and extract. Do not damage the bore, but you will so have some 600grit sand paper to clean up your mess.



After this you need to install the bushings. This is where the drift tools come into play. I did not have them so I had to improvise, First I used a 14mm deep socket to knock in the 5th bushing. It stops at the bevel so thats ok. Next up I used a large transmission bolt that the round flange was almost perfect. It is needed on the reverse bushing as it sits about .060 down in the bore. This really tweaked the lip of the bushing, agian more sandpaper to clean it up. The pin should slide down easily in the bore.

The reverse pin is part number is the 849 part and has a straight slant. The slant must face downwards. 5th gear has a curved slant and the slant point upwards, part number 165. The sad thing is this trans appears to have been serviced before and someone used both reverse pins instead of the curved pin for the 5th. This maybe why it seized up. Clean any debris out with carb cleaner then oil down the bores, I also used assembly lube on the pins.




Finally you will need to install the seal caps and retaining rings. I used a heavy end of the slide hammer to push the cap in with the ring and then using ring pliers squeeze and push, bam, should lock into place. The reverse spring is very stiff so you will most likely want someone to help you. I did not have that and it was a bitch, I braced the trans against the tool box so I could push as hard as I needed. It might make you cry, its ok. I had Kim Falcon to cheer me on, lol That is it. Done.



If I was to do this again, I would have a machine shop make me a drift to knock in the bushings. The socket method does a bit of damage that needs to be cleaned up. But it is still very doable. Patience will be a virtue in this repair exercise.

Catch Pin Repairs.

This repair is a hugely easier then the above repair.

Here is where they are located, the 3 well caps I have indicated with white marks.


First you pull the cap. Using a punch indent the center of the cap, then screw in a sheet metal screw and yank out with the slide hammer. Grab the spring and use a small magnet to remove the catch pin.


Here is the new parts compared to the old parts


Here is the ONLY tool I was able to get from the dealer and I am happy to have had it as in the end it only took 30 minutes to perform this repair to all 3 catch pins. Tool 110



After you installed the new catch pin and spring you will need to hammer in a new cap. A 8mm 1/4 deep socket did the trick here just fine.



That is it. DONE. Next up for this trans is I will pour in a quart of 0/20 motor oil and slosh it all around to wash out any debris and old synchro material. I do this on all my transmissions when they come out for service, you would be amazed at the crap that washes out of them.

Finally I will be installing BMW approved Pentosil MFL long life synthetic trans fluid.

Enjoy.
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dale



Joined: 22 Aug 1999
Posts: 3085
Location: Seattle, WA USA

PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2010 9:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Robert,
Thanks for posting this. Fantastic writeup!

I just bought 2 of these transmissions and need to do these updates to both.

I'll post more about why I have 2 of these transmissions over the next couple of months.

Dale
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dale



Joined: 22 Aug 1999
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Location: Seattle, WA USA

PostPosted: Wed Mar 03, 2010 3:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I finally did these repairs to one of my trans today. Went pretty much as Robert described above. One difference is when installing the cap and circlip, I used a long bar-clamp, with a short 1/4" drive extension and 8mm socket. The clamp pressed the extension and socket into the cap which pressed it into place. I had the circlip already in place on the extension and was able to just install it and release the clamp.

The bar-clamp I used looked something like these:

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cmcon98



Joined: 13 Nov 2002
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Location: Boston

PostPosted: Sun Mar 14, 2010 3:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm assuming BMW never did a recall on this. The 5th gear gate detent plunger sometimes sticks in my new-to-me E36 M3. It looks like the detent plugs are on the right side of the tranny aft of the bellhousing area. Can the dealer replace the plunger, sleeves, and springs without removing the tranny from the car? I haven't looked under there yet to see how much space there is around the tranny. I'm seeing dollar signs, so if they'll have to pull the tranny, I'll just live with it and shift carefully.
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cmcon98



Joined: 13 Nov 2002
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Location: Boston

PostPosted: Mon Mar 29, 2010 10:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now that I look at it, If I absolutely had to replace the Reverse or 5th gate plunger/bushing/spring (my reverse gate works fine), I'd be tempted to remove the front carpet from the car and cut a small access hole in the tranny tunnel sheet metal. Replace the parts from inside the car, then cap the hole with a plastic or metal plug and some body sealer. Sounds a little barbaric, but it would turn an all-weekend (at least) job into an afternoon job, and would sure beat removing the entire tranny, driveshaft, exhaust system, etc.

I'm going to nurse mine for now. It's fine when the car is warmed up. If it gets worse, or sticks and stays stuck, I'll have to address it, tho.
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dale



Joined: 22 Aug 1999
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 15, 2010 10:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

BMW fixed this under warranty as people complained about the various issues.

In 1996, my 1995 M3 with this trans started having an issue with sticking in 3rd gear. Brought it to the dealer, and I'm assuming they pulled the trans and applied one or more of these fixes, and problem solved.

But, if the previous owner never followed up with the dealer it didn't get done.
BMW never sent out a recall telling everyone to bring in their car to have this fix done.

Dale
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bbarnumboy



Joined: 03 Feb 2011
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 03, 2011 1:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry to bring this old topic back to life but i need to do this repair.

I have a question regarding the parts list.

For one, will this work on my 1995 version?

Also your list is stated here

Quote:
5th and Reverse Repair parts needed.
23 11 7 542 726 Repair Kit $5.68 X2 (Contains 1 bushing, 1 seal cap, 1 lock ring)
23 31 1 224 849 Locking Pin $8.25 X1 (Detent Pin, Reverse)
23 31 7 502 165 Locking Pin $9.91 X1 (Detent Pin, 5th gear)

Catch Pin Repair parts needed.
23 11 7 525 048 Detent Pins, Set $11.97 X3 (Sleeve, Catch Pin, Spring)
07 11 9 937 227 Cover Lid $0.59 X3 (Cover Caps for catch pins)



From the picture it shows you are doing the reverse and the 5th gear pin and sleeves. But why is the repair kit only calling out 1 bushing, seal cap and lock ring? So do i need to buy two of these kits?

The same for the catch pin setup.

Or did i miss something and the detent pin comes with the sleeve?

Is it necessary to do both the detents and the catch pins?
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dale



Joined: 22 Aug 1999
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 13, 2011 7:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes this should work on the 1995 310ZF trans in addition to the 1996-1999(and newer) 320ZF trans.

You don't _have_ to do all the repairs if some are not causing trouble.

You can replace any 1 of the 6(?) pieces by itself, but everything in that 1 chamber/cylinder/piston combo must be replaced as a unit.

Dale
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